THREE FOR THE WEEKEND

You don’t deserve it.  You weren’t all that good this week.  Plus, I’m still upset that my favorite hockey team was knocked out of the playoffs.   Nonetheless, I am gifting you today with three more pearls of Aleen Keshishian wisdom.

Let’s Not Dwell.  The key is to say this way before the other person shows even a hint of dwelling.

This came from a conversation between Aleen and another talent rep.  They were getting ready to talk to an actor on the phone.  Aleen explained what the actor was feeling, and said the feelings ran very deep.  She said the actor would need to vent those emotions prior to making the hard decision which Aleen and her fellow rep wanted the actor to make.

The whole message was, ‘Let him vent.’

And then of course, during the actual phone call, as soon as the actor even began to emote, the other rep jumped in and barked at him in an angry, impatient voice: “Let’s not dwell!”

Aleen was horrified, and the conversation went south from there.  But Aleen didn’t lose the lesson.  Or at least she didn’t lose the saying.

You can use this saying to prevent others from telling you how they feel.

 Geegos.  This is another way of saying, “Mary-Stuart, you’re panicking.”  It comes from an Armenian fable.

At dinner, a girl is sent to the well to fetch water for her family.  She doesn’t come back for a long time.  The dad sends another daughter.  She too doesn’t come back.  Soon, he has sent all three daughters, plus his wife.  None come back.  He goes to the well himself, and finds the whole family weeping uncontrollably.

He asks what the problem is.  The first daughter says, “I was down here getting water, and I was thinking, ‘What if I have a child someday, and he comes down here to get water, and he falls into the well and DROWNS?’”

The daughter breaks into heaving sobs, while the second daughter takes over.  “My nephew!  Down at the bottom of the well!  Gasping for breath, lungs filling with water!”

Each person takes a turn imagining the drowning, including the mother’s final, absurdly hysterical screams over the loss of the grandson she never had.

The name of the imaginary boy who drowns is Geegos.

When someone is panicking about things that haven’t happened yet, you just say, Geegos.

Or you can say, Mary-Stuart.  That still works too.  It’s according to personal preference.

And the truth is, my wife doesn’t use this one as much as I myself use it, to address her.

His brother is NOT a musical prodigy.  Our good friend David Geller once showed us a TV clip about an amazing boy in New York City who was already composing symphonies at the age of 11.  This kid was a total savant.  He was constantly hearing symphonies in his head, and then setting them down on paper.

But in the middle of the TV clip, the camera panned across the living room to the boy’s younger brother.  He was banging a spoon against his forehead, or trying to stick his finger in a light socket – something like that.

With perfect understatement, the reporter intoned, “His brother is not a musical prodigy.”

In our household, this is now shorthand for, The kid has absolutely no aptitude in this area.  

To protect their privacy, I won’t tell you which activities cause Aleen and me to say this about our own children.  But let me just say, the activities may involve the performing arts, and possibly singing and dancing in particular.

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About kittroyer

Kit Troyer lives in Los Angeles.
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3 Responses to THREE FOR THE WEEKEND

  1. brad says:

    taking your advice. not dwelling on NHL playoffs except that I am now cheering for Montreal South (Tampa Bay) to shred Boston like secret documents.

    Not dwelling on Gold’s regular season performance.

    Looking forward to a little rinky-dink tomorrow w/the kids 🙂

  2. Karen Todd says:

    Best yet. All 3 totally useful and immediately applicable. I see a book in this. Keep ’em coming. Dare I hope for a special Mother’s Day edition?

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